An overview of IPM measures in four member countries

National plans and actions with regard to IPM in four European countries were described at the C-IPM workshop held in Poland in January 2015.

2015.02.20 | Janne Hansen

At a C-IPM workshop in Poland presentatios were given from four different countries outlining how IPM they tackle IPM. Photo: Janne Hansen

At the latest C-IPM workshop, held in Poznan, Poland, in January 2015, the participants discussed issues regarding IPM research and implementation. In support of this, representatives from four European countries presented the IPM situation in their countries.

The four speakers explained how IPM research is organized in their country, how IPM research objectives are defined, organized and disseminated and how these issues are addressed in their country’s National Action Plan. They also explained the role of stakeholders and the link between IPM research and extension, if there is one. Finally, they expressed their expectations with regard to the added value gained from transnational collaboration and how it can be integrated with the country’s national research agenda.

The countries presenting were France, Spain, Turkey and Finland.

Pierre Grenier from the French Ministry of Agriculture described the national IPM programme Écophyto. This programme has conducted a nationwide survey to identify gaps in knowledge and methods. The results of the survey have been used to convert needs into research questions and programmes. The topics were then prioritized and Écophyto-labeled calls for projects eligible for specific funding were announced. Écophyto collects, synthesises and disseminates project results that are applicable in practice.

In Spain IPM research topics have been identified. As presented by Antonieta De Cal from the National Institute for Agricultural Research and Experimentation (INIA) these include biotic relations in agriculture and forest systems, emerging pests in agriculture and forestry, and resistance to plant protection products and alternatives. Research topics are prioritized according to the following criteria:

  • crop economic importance in Spanish agriculture
  • importance of economic losses caused by pests, diseases and weeds in Spanish agriculture
  • lack of effective control measure
  • emerging character
  • feasibility of control
  • IPM programmes

The Turkish speaker, Nursen Üstün from Turkey’s Plant Protection Research Station, belonging to General Directorate of Agricultural Research and Policy, explained that IPM research is coordinated centrally in Turkey. Most IPM projects are supported by the Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Livestock. Growers play a role in definition of research needs. IPM research topics are studied under 16 crop-based projects on crops having IPM national instructions.

Training of extension staff by scientists is considered to be a very important activity for disseminating research knowledge of IPM. Courses are held for extension workers in each of 16 crops. The extension workers then train farmers at farm schools or in the field. Farmers can acquire a certificate that proves they are IPM producers.

Irene Vänninen from the Natural Resources Institute in Finland outlined the flow of resources that go to research in IPM. The main funding comes from four ministries: Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry, Ministry of Education and Culture, Ministry of the Environment, and Ministry of Employment and the Economy. Research funds flow to research institutions and universities, which often collaborate with each other. Results from organic farming research also benefit IPM

There is a tenuous link between research and extension in Finland but it is still undergoing development. The speaker mentioned that collaboration with other countries, especially those with similar pest problems, has several benefits, including resistance management, compiling and sharing information of existing IPM methods, and developing decision support systems. The organization of IPM research is undergoing reconstruction at the moment, with special emphasis on how to organize the interface between researchers, extension and agricultural producers.

 

 

 

An overview of IPM measures in four member countries

National plans and actions with regard to IPM in four European countries were described at the C-IPM workshop held in Poland in January 2015.

At the latest C-IPM workshop, held in Poznan, Poland, in January 2015, the participants discussed issues regarding IPM research and implementation. In support of this, representatives from four European countries presented the IPM situation in their countries.

The four speakers explained how IPM research is organized in their country, how IPM research objectives are defined, organized and disseminated and how these issues are addressed in their country’s National Action Plan. They also explained the role of stakeholders and the link between IPM research and extension, if there is one. Finally, they expressed their expectations with regard to the added value gained from transnational collaboration and how it can be integrated with the country’s national research agenda.

The countries presenting were France, Spain, Turkey and Finland.

Pierre Grenier from the French Ministry of Agriculture described the national IPM programme Écophyto. This programme has conducted a nationwide survey to identify gaps in knowledge and methods. The results of the survey have been used to convert needs into research questions and programmes. The topics were then prioritized and Écophyto-labeled calls for projects eligible for specific funding were announced. Écophyto collects, synthesises and disseminates project results that are applicable in practice.

In Spain IPM research topics have been identified. As presented by Antonieta De Cal from the National Institute for Agricultural Research and Experimentation (INIA) these include biotic relations in agriculture and forest systems, emerging pests in agriculture and forestry, and resistance to plant protection products and alternatives. Research topics are prioritized according to the following criteria:

  • crop economic importance in Spanish agriculture
  • importance of economic losses caused by pests, diseases and weeds in Spanish agriculture
  • lack of effective control measure
  • emerging character
  • feasibility of control
  • IPM programmes

The Turkish speaker, Nursen Üstün from Turkey’s Plant Protection Research Station, belonging to General Directorate of Agricultural Research and Policy, explained that IPM research is coordinated centrally in Turkey. Most IPM projects are supported by the Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Livestock. Growers play a role in definition of research needs. IPM research topics are studied under 16 crop-based projects on crops having IPM national instructions.

Training of extension staff by scientists is considered to be a very important activity for disseminating research knowledge of IPM. Courses are held for extension workers in each of 16 crops. The extension workers then train farmers at farm schools or in the field. Farmers can acquire a certificate that proves they are IPM producers.

Irene Vänninen from the Natural Resources Institute in Finland outlined the flow of resources that go to research in IPM. The main funding comes from four ministries: Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry, Ministry of Education and Culture, Ministry of the Environment, and Ministry of Employment and the Economy. Research funds flow to research institutions and universities, which often collaborate with each other. Results from organic farming research also benefit IPM

There is a tenuous link between research and extension in Finland but it is still undergoing development. The speaker mentioned that collaboration with other countries, especially those with similar pest problems, has several benefits, including resistance management, compiling and sharing information of existing IPM methods, and developing decision support systems. The organization of IPM research is undergoing reconstruction at the moment, with special emphasis on how to organize the interface between researchers, extension and agricultural producers.

 

 

 

Agriculture and food